Wolf Leo

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mit Jochen-Martin Gutsch: Single-family: zwei Männer-zwei Welten. 66 wahre Geschichten, Illustrationen von Wolf Leo. Herder, Freiburg im Breisgau/​Basel/. Wolf Leo. meine Arbeiten. Classic. Classic · Flipcard · Magazine · Mosaic · Sidebar · Snapshot · Timeslide. Pages. Wolf Leo · Startseite · Malerei · Bilder Aus der „Ostkrise“ sieht sich Wolf Leo in die „Westkrise“ geschleudert, aus dem Stillstand ins Koma der Beschleunigung, wie er in einem Essay schreibt. Leo ist. The galleries in Berlin are currently closed to visitors until further notice in order to help contain the spread of the coronavirus. Stay healthy, STAY AT HOME, and​. Daten zum Werk. Wolf Leo: Gedenkstele Todesmarsch I / Wegzeichen (, Lehm, Beton) Burgtorbrücke / Ecke Fährstraße, Lübeck.

Wolf Leo

Wolf Leo, geb, Facharbeiter Retuscheur, Studium an der Fachschule für Angewandte Kunst in Berlin, Grafik und Design. Seit freiberuflich in allen. The galleries in Berlin are currently closed to visitors until further notice in order to help contain the spread of the coronavirus. Stay healthy, STAY AT HOME, and​. Wolf Leo. meine Arbeiten. Classic. Classic · Flipcard · Magazine · Mosaic · Sidebar · Snapshot · Timeslide. Pages. Wolf Leo · Startseite · Malerei · Bilder I would have appreciated a couple more instances of battles being dealt with or depicted in another manner. These flares emit strong bursts of X-ray and gamma ray radiation that have been observed by space telescopes. Roper, son of the Black Lord and leader of the Black Visit web page, finds himself in command during his first battle when his father is slain in battle which leads to the first Anakim defeat in more than a article source years. As a result of magnetic activity caused by Wolf LeoWolf is a flare star that can undergo sudden increases in luminosity for several minutes. Review to come.

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Dieser Text ist Teil des nd-Archivs seit Eine Allegorie ohne Zweifel, aber auf was? Zu allen Artikeln. Nach der ersten Sichtung der Transparente durchliefen sie als nächsten Schritt über Roulette Chances Wochen eine Vorrichtung, in der mittels Stickstoff mögliche Schädlinge vernichtet wurden, die im Depot eine Gefahr für andere Sammlungsstücke dargestellt hätten, wie zum Beispiel With Spiele Temple Quest - Video Slots Online removed. Bei einem Bombenangriff am 3.

Author Recent Posts. The first reply that comes to mind should someone ask me "who are you? That's what I have always been since I could understand the meaning of words on a page.

And speculative fiction is my go-to medium when I want to lose myself in the works of an author: fantasy, science fiction, and all the in-between genres are perfect to answer the endlessly fascinating question of "what if?

Latest posts by Maddalena see all. Barker - February 7, This indicates the star must be at least million years old. Beyond the photosphere lies a nebulous, high temperature region known as the stellar corona.

In , Wolf became the first star other than the Sun to have the spectrum of its corona observed from a ground-based telescope.

The spectrum showed emission lines of Fe XIII, which is heavily ionized iron that has been stripped of twelve of its electrons.

Wolf is classified as a UV Ceti -type flare star , [3] which is a star that undergoes brief, energetic increases in luminosity because of magnetic activity in the photosphere.

Its variable star designation is CN Leonis. Wolf has a relatively high flare rate. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope detected 32 flare events within a two-hour period, with energies of 10 27 ergs 10 20 joules and higher.

The rotation of a star causes a Doppler shift to the spectrum. On average, this results in a broadening of the absorption lines in its spectrum, with the lines increasing in width with higher rates of rotation.

However, only the rotational motion in the direction of the observer can be measured by this means, so the resulting data provides a lower limit on the star's rotation.

Typically, the time scale for the spin down of a star at spectral class M6 is roughly 10 billion years, because fully convective stars like this lose their rotation more slowly than other stars.

The proper motion Wolf against the background is 4. It follows an orbit through the Milky Way that will bring it as close as The galactic orbit has an eccentricity of 0.

In June two candidate planets were reported in orbit around Wolf From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the star.

For the fictional Star Trek battle, see Battle of Wolf For the podcast, see Wolf podcast. Wolf is shown near the ecliptic in the southern region of Leo bottom middle.

Star portal. Retrieved May The Astronomical Journal. Bibcode : AJ See table II. Astrophysics and Space Science. The Astrophysical Journal.

Bibcode : ApJ See: Lang, Kenneth R. Astrophysical formulae. Astronomy and Astrophysics Library.

Research Consortium on Nearby Stars. Astronomy and Astrophysics. September April October Veroeffentlichungen der Badischen Sternwarte zu Heidelberg.

Bibcode : VeHei Can he keep the Anakim intact with also fighting a civil war from within? I felt that the characters, battles, and politics were a little flat.

Me favourite sections were the discussions of the culture of the Anakim and particularly their relationship with nature and hardship.

I also liked the civil war elements of the Anakim sections and the parts that took place at the Northern keep. While in general I cheered for the Anakim side, I did occasionally find Roper to be a ineffectual leader whose successes seemed more lucky than skillful.

Also the set-up for the next book was a bit abrupt in the end. Side note: I wish that fantasy authors would stop using the North as lands of ice, snow, and barbarians and the South as lands of heat, culture, and learning.

There be other cardinal points, folks! So lastly. Thank ye Orbit Books! The Wolf was in parts a challenging read for me and yet by the end I came to admire it.

The Anakim as a race, a culture, as characters are probably some of the most intriguing I have come across in a while.

Entirely geared towards war, their bodies are quite literally built for battles, and war is something they take great pride in, and yet, with the exception of a few too ambitious characters, they keep a very level head about their way of life.

The Anakim value their culture, their homes and th The Wolf was in parts a challenging read for me and yet by the end I came to admire it.

The Anakim value their culture, their homes and their country on a very deep-rooted level. The Sutherners, who share the border with the Anakim, are polar opposites.

That is why they are such a voracious race. They have no time, and so they must consume. They each want to see change in their own lifetime.

We know that we just have to wait and change will come. Neither side had hardly enough of that burning desire to occupy the land that was so different to their own.

The Anakim are a culture that settle, firmly and permanently, and the Sutherners would hardly manage in the harsh conditions that the Anakim thrive.

But no matter how devastating the outcome of a war in between two countries is, adding a civil war into the mix ratchets things up another notch.

And so, The Wolf explores the alliances formed, loyalties tested, grudges eliminated… The Black Lord does not cry. So Roper howled instead.

The world building alone is rich, especially that of the Anakim, and Carew left no stone unturned to give readers the full experience.

I do have to say, though, that at times there was perhaps too much information in certain parts. Yes, it was relevant to the particular scene but somehow it still disconnected me from the present timeline of ongoing events.

But as I mentioned earlier- after reconsidering the overall reading experience- I can only admire this book as a whole.

The Anakim and their larger than life war-hardened presence. The Sutherners with their many politically driven ambitions.

This is war!!! And now that the scene is set, I quite look forward to the perilous journey the Black Lord will take me next… Jul 10, Bookwraiths rated it liked it Shelves: e-books , fantasy.

Review to come. I was sure it was gonna be my next favorite book. It had everything I love, even the cover is exactly my cup of tea.

Unfortunately, while the premise was very interesting, the execution fell short for me. Towards the end it got so boring that I skimmed the last pages which I rarely do.

The Wolf by Leo Carew - What it is and what it is not. What it is - It is a meticulously detailed fantasy of medieval-type warfare with a southern nation being the belligerent and the north the invaded.

Nothing in this book is trivial. Every nut and bolt is described. The settings, the cities, the landscape, everything comes alive in the readers mind.

The reader is drawn wholly into the author's world. Battles are bloody and intense. No one comes out unscathed from any encounter.

The realism is authentic. Your tangled guts exposed in the air. You could lose a limb, an eye, your hand; the feeble flesh carved open by steel.

While those elements are in the story, they aren't as relevant as I imagine the author wanted them to be. It is an extremely male-dominated world, hostile and savage.

Men are fiercely loyal to their leaders and friends, to their Houses and lords. Few if any try to escape or rise above their station other than one of the main characters, Uvoren good name , who thinks the boy-king Roper should just serve as a figurehead and let him rule.

The boy-king manages to acquire allies to challenge Uvoren but it seems these alliances aren't based on his talent or skills, but out of their former loyalty to the deceased father and the House, and their concerns over Uvoren, although Uvoren doesn't seem to be anything particularly evil or wretched, just a talented commander without respect for Roper's lineage.

In fact, most of the time, Uvoren seems better equipped to be leader for this particular world than Roper.

The enemy is also part of the story and they are pretty much of the same mindset as the people they are invading.

The motivations to invade, fight and survive seem to be the main theme for everyone. I actually took a liking to the Bellamus character.

All the men in the story are actually much alike, strong and martial, often in each other's faces if there is a problem. The brutality is intense.

In the end, the books greatest strength is also its greatest weakness. The attention to detail actually serves to distract from some very good verbal exchanges between characters.

I can think of one particular passage offhand where the characters moved through a city and it was like walking in mud, taking nearly three pages to get from one end to the other simply because the author found it necessary to describe everything, and I mean everything they were seeing, hearing, smelling and sensing.

In the end, it put the reader there but it wasn't pertinent to the story. We didn't need that information, not that much.

I like descriptive world building but I had a difficult time reading through this scene and several others like it.

I'm pretty sure people who don't enjoy reading that much description would have trouble finishing something like this.

Don't get me wrong. It's a very good book and the author is extremely talented. No doubt he did his homework and his talent bleeds from every page and sentence.

If medieval warfare, blood and guts, male bonding, and two kingdoms fighting to save their cultures is your kind of thing, you will love this book.

If you are looking for an intricate, multi-layered world of schemers and strong female leads, this is not that book.

Four stars. Mar 19, Ova - Excuse My Reading rated it liked it. This book may resemble Game of Thrones.

There are couple of differences between the two for me but most important is that I found myself skim-reading this book. Okay GoT books were long, but they made you float alongside.

You didn't skip a single sentence. Don"t get me wrong, this is not a bad book at all. It just feels exhaustively long.

There is yet another fantasy world, and we follow the newly appointed northern 'Black Lord' through his struggle to protect his land from Southerners.

Apr 08, Jon Adams rated it it was amazing. This didn't feel like a debut. I enjoyed it so much that I actually read it on my Kindle at home, which is rare for me.

I much prefer paper. Fascinating world-building, interesting character development, great action. If you dig politics and war, give it a shot.

May 22, RG rated it liked it. This was a pretty good fantasy debut. It had a touch of military heroic fantasy with majority of the storys main focus being the political scheming.

There are two main naitons, the Anakims North and the Sutherners South. The north is more barbarian like as compared to the more civilised South.

I had a hard time with that concept as I felt they were equally civilised and at times the Anakim felt more civislised. The action was solid, the characters a little one dimensional as they all felt a This was a pretty good fantasy debut.

The action was solid, the characters a little one dimensional as they all felt a little too similar.

I really did like Roper and would've loved to have had just him as the one central character. The political scheming element is probably the factor which is reminding people of GoT.

To a degree yes but that's like saying every fantasy novel that has political scheming reminds you of GoT.

It does it well but just not as good as GoT. But I guess thats some of the debut writing coming out. With more experience this element will improve.

The world building is great and I can see more room to grow with the other areas on the map. We got glimpses but nothing overly concrete.

Good solid fantasy with an author I'm sure will provide more novels with his potential. Feb 28, Olivera rated it liked it Shelves: Jan 25, Jashana rated it it was ok Shelves: This was a low 3-star for me -- 5.

TL;DR: Not awful by any means. But not my cup of tea mostly due to writing style and plot. I didn't necessarily "hate read" this book I was determined to finish this book.

It wasn't a miserable read by any means, but for me personally the constant uphill struggle of our main character, Roper, This was a low 3-star for me -- 5.

It wasn't a miserable read by any means, but for me personally the constant uphill struggle of our main character, Roper, was tiresome.

A lot of, "Hey we have a new plan! Oh frick, that isn't working out how we wanted Well damn it, that kind of backfired This kind of a plot is probably fantastic for some, but I am not one of those people.

The world was interesting, which is more or less the only thing that, well, kept my interest! The character development wasn't great.

There was really only one female character who was at all prominent But I didn't feel connected to any of them -- in the intense battles, I did not care one way or another who died.

The writing style is a bit repetitive in parts; we have lonnnggg descriptions that last pages, totally pulling us out of any action that was happening.

I was heavily skimming by the end, not going to lie. Feb 24, Sammie rated it really liked it Shelves: netgalley One-Line Summary: A massive battle of wits, one within a kingdom and one between kingdoms, where the loser forfeits their life and no one truly wins.

So sure of their victory, the Anakim are taken by surprise to find the Sutherners have laid a One-Line Summary: A massive battle of wits, one within a kingdom and one between kingdoms, where the loser forfeits their life and no one truly wins.

So sure of their victory, the Anakim are taken by surprise to find the Sutherners have laid a trapped, one that wipes out many of their soldiers and results in the death of their king, the Black Lord.

Not everyone is so thrilled with the young, inexperienced upstart, though. Uvoren, Master of the Guard, sees his chance to supplant the rule.

The Sutherners have their own upstart. Not exactly young, but from a lowly and ignoble birth, Bellamus intends to do whatever it takes to earn his status in society.

Only one person can win this battle of wits, but at what cost? The Positives: - Strategy and sabotage and stabbiness and supplanting and all the other great S words and other letters, probably, too.

They have to be cunning and always one step ahead. The game of one-upmanship is everything I could have hoped for and then some.

Keturah has her own game going on behind the scenes. Missing ear and all. I really liked the way his character grew through this. He seems like a worthy adversary for Roper, and I look forward to seeing what he does in the next books.

The differences between the cultures and groups is fabulously done. They each have their own religions and beliefs and ways of approaching life, which makes it pretty nigh on impossible for them to actually understand each other.

I thought the cultures were marvelously done, and I got a really good sense of those two groups. I actually look forward to learning more about the Unhierea, which I assume will come in the later books.

Well, this is about to get interesting. But no. Every time, he unfailingly proved me wrong. That is all I have to say about that.

The Negatives: - As great as the cultural aspect was, the worldbuilding is a bit lacking. Especially for a high fantasy. The map shows that where this takes place is obviously an island, albeit a decent sized one.

But beyond that, this feels like it takes place in a microcosm. The races are so vastly different the Anakim at around seven feet with bone plates under their skin and the Sutherners, who seem to basically be like normal humans as we know them yet I have no sense of why this is or how it came to be.

Which is problematic, given that I read the whole thing. Well, mostly. I confess, I may have skipped some descriptions when it became too much, so I very well might have missed something rather important.

I guess I pictured them as not entirely human-looking. There were some fantastic and important descriptions, but there were also times when it became overbearing.

I can conjure up the image of a fort just fine without three pages describing the buildings and exactly what it looked like.

It may not be exactly what the author imagined, but it gets the job done. The battles also dragged on in some places and became a bit repetitive.

As I said, I love a good game of wits. I easily found myself taking sides, shaking the book, lecturing characters, and altogether getting embroiled in the war itself.

All in all, this was a good book. Finished re-reading Updated rating 3. So I am giving this another read to see what I think now.

There was nothing "wrong" with this book. I just didn't really enjoy it. The prologue felt too long, and that made it harder for me to get invested in this book.

It was Finished re-reading Updated rating 3. It was well written with well written and developed characters. I just don't really enjoy books that are very focused on political intrigue.

While the characters were well written, I often lost track of who was who. Their names were hard for me to follow from time to time.

As I said, this is in no way a bad book, just not my cup of tea. Jan 06, Susan Hampson rated it it was amazing. It is one magnificent epic read!

Set in medieval times the country is divided into two nations. The Anakim in the north where they live under the rule of Kynortas, the Black Lord.

It is much colder in the north and the people are rugged, living off the land and being trained in battle skills from a young age.

When the armies of the Sutherners are stirred up by a commoner Bellamus, he invades the North, killing Kynortas and leaving his son Roper to take his place as the Black Lord.

Things take a bit of a dive so when Roper and the army return home his ability to rule is in the balance. This is one cracking story of battles, politics and betrayals that centre round three men, Bellamus from the south, Roper who is new in the position of the Black Lord and Uvoren a warrior of Anakim that sees himself a more worthy to rule than Roper.

I soon felt myself taking sides. Roper had so much to prove that he takes pretty dodgy chances with some undesirable people and it makes for some real page turning, take your breath moments.

All played out in glorious technicolour in my mind. So looking forward to the follow-up in April May 09, Kylie rated it liked it Shelves: books-i-own.

I ended up not hating it, but I definitely didn't love it. It's not that it was a bad book, I just think it wasn't for me. It was very hard to get into.

A lot of names were thrown out in the first few chapters and I couldn't remember who they were let alone what side of the war they were on.

It took me quite a long time to even figure out who the main character was.

Nov 27, Liz Barnsley rated it it was amazing. Acta Physica Polonica B. Luhman 16 6. By contrast the Sutherners live in the moment, their vitality much more immediate click to see more ephemeral https://josefinalopez.co/online-casino-bonus-no-deposit/beste-spielothek-in-peterborn-finden.php their Anakim neighbours. More like the next Abercrombie.

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Die Demonstration der Studentenbewegungen mit ca. Ab wurde er mit der Gestaltung von Büchern und Plakaten bekannt bevor er in den er Jahren Plastiken aus fragilen Werkstoffen schuf. Verwaltung check this out Konzept für Betrieb in Justizvollzugsanstalten unter Abstands- und Hygienebedingungen vor. Nach der ersten Sichtung der Transparente durchliefen sie als source Schritt über vier Wochen eine Vorrichtung, in der mittels Here mögliche Schädlinge vernichtet wurden, die im Depot eine Gefahr für andere Poker Buch dargestellt hätten, wie zum Beispiel Motten. Das Fleisch gehört uns nicht Warum politischer Continue reading der Auftakt zu einer humanen Gesellschaft sein könnte. Ein fast freundlicher Hades, der durch das Fensterlicht illuminiert wird, ein begehbares Bilder-Ballett, in dem eine aus kubischen Wellpappe-Stücken more info Eurydike-Skulptur im Zurückfallen stillsteht. Der Transformator von Weiblichkeit in Kunst. Sie dokumentieren für künftige Generationen more info folgende Demonstrationen:.

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Dieser Text ist Teil des nd-Archivs seit Die Stele ist eine von insgesamt zwölf ähnlichen Arbeiten, die an verschiedenen Orten zwischen Lübeck und Neustadt in Holstein aufgestellt sind. Zu allen Artikeln. Ines Hahn , erstellt am Zu den Initiatoren gehörte der Architekt Wolfgang Kil, der mehr als 20 dieser Transparente über die Zeit aufbewahrte, nachdem sie in verschiedenen Ausstellungen gezeigt worden waren. Unter www. Ab begann er mit Plastiken auch aus Beton und Lehm als Werkstoff zu verarbeiten. Leo ist beharrlich und mitteilsam, Pogo News liebt es nicht Wolf Leo, in Dimensionen der Utopie zu denken, sondern auch, bedeutsame Gedanken in lapidaren Formulierungen enden zu lassen. Denkmäler sind von Symbolen der Vergangenheit zu Anlässen für Debatten über gesellschaftliche Zukunft geworden. Für Betroffene von häuslicher Gewalt mangelt es an Kinderbetreuung und Beratung, es soll mehr Personal geben. Am Wir können damit die Seitennutzung auswerten, um nutzungsbasiert redaktionelle Inhalte und Werbung anzuzeigen. Besonders die learn more here Protestslogans und Bilder auf den selbst gebastelten Transparenten, die dem Drängen der Menschen bildhaften Ausdruck verliehen, bleiben bis heute im Gedächtnis. Beste Spielothek in finden Berlin und Brandenburg. Wir beobachten alle sozialen und sozioökonomischen Entwicklung in der Hauptstadtregion, die sich aus der Verbreitung des Coronavirus ergeben. Das Fleisch gehört uns nicht Warum politischer Veganismus der Auftakt zu einer humanen Gesellschaft sein könnte. Dieser Eindruck ist absichtlich herbeigeführt und wird durch die Spuren des Herstellungsprozesses unterstrichen, die Wolf Leo Surebet der porösen Oberfläche zeigen. Tot lebendig, den ganzen Rest wird uns der Künstler sicher später einmal erklären. Dezember auf dem Ost-Berliner Bebelplatz. Ab begann er mit Plastiken auch aus Beton und Lehm als Werkstoff zu verarbeiten. FaГџeln die geistreichen Protestslogans und Bilder auf den selbst gebastelten Transparenten, die dem Drängen der Menschen bildhaften Ausdruck verliehen, bleiben bis heute im Gedächtnis. Links ist ein Ensemble von Gemälden in den Raum hinein gehängt. Der Transformator von Weiblichkeit in Kunst. Wolf Leo wurde in Berlin geboren und studierte an der Fachhochschule für angewandte Click in Berlin. KiöR Künstler*innen. Wolf Leo. Skulptur. Footer menu. Impressum · Datenschutzerklärung · Die Werkstätten und Büros im kulturwerk sind partiell wieder geöffnet. Wolf Leo, geb, Facharbeiter Retuscheur, Studium an der Fachschule für Angewandte Kunst in Berlin, Grafik und Design. Seit freiberuflich in allen. Ein „Flammenkopf“ des Berliner Künstlers Wolf Leo – Sinnbild für den Aufbruch und das Aufbegehren © & Foto: Ines Hahn. Ironie als. Wolf, Leo (geb. in Berlin, tätig in Berlin u. Grünow) Farbholzschnitt. "​Seltsames Singen". Illustriert mit Worten von Jürgen Rennert. In Blei von Künstler​.

Book Reviewed by Steve on www. When Kynortas is felled during a failed battle against the Sutherners, control of the legions and the Black Kingdom is instantly bequest to Roper, forcing him to make the most difficult decision on the battlefield.

On his return to the Black Kingdom, he has to face the music. An inexperienced ruler facing opposition from everywhere possible, including the Captain of the Sacred Gua Book Reviewed by Steve on www.

An inexperienced ruler facing opposition from everywhere possible, including the Captain of the Sacred Guard, Uvoren, Roper has to use all of his strength and cunning to fortify his position as the Black Lord.

During this journey, Roper twists and turns to try and carry favour with the people of the Black Kingdom, getting help along the way from a few trusted allies.

The only real way to gain the complete support of his subjects is to take revenge on the Sutherners for what they did to the forces of the Black Kingdom, and what they did to his father.

Roper has the ultimate test ahead of him. The Wolf is set in medieval times, with armies of pike men, cavalry and berserkers, where the sword is typically the weapon of choice.

Leo does a wonderful job of setting scenes. His descriptions of buildings, rooms and atmosphere are fantastic and it is very easy to put yourself in the scene, right there with the characters.

The battle scenes would be right at home in the film Braveheart and are wonderfully detailed. This book is so easy to read and you will get a lot of enjoyment out of it.

I am now eagerly looking forward to the second book in the series, The Spider, which is released April View 2 comments.

Mar 13, Larissa Book Bosomed Blonde rated it did not like it. Well, that is this book for me!

War, Norse influence, with a bloody twist and its own language, it sounded so cool to me. However, it was only an interesting premise with a less than engaging plot line.

Such a cool idea for a story, i really wish it delivered more for me. The writing style is really what did it in!

It just seemed to drone on and on, the chapters each getting longer as you continue and it really was a struggle for me to finish. The book is very much founded on politics.

Where are the emotions and feelings in this?? The plot is actually interesting though. Two warring Kingdoms, both completely different, from looks to actions.

Competing for title and land in a barren and brutal landscape. If this plot was actually focused on more, than it would have been really interesting, but unfortunately it was just too political for me to cope with.

View all 5 comments. Apr 03, The Captain rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. Ahoy there me mateys! So here be me honest musings.

While I enjoyed this book while reading, I find that overall my impression is that it is just an okay read.

The book has a very Norse feel to it in me limited experience and is about two cultures at war.

The Anakim are the Northerners who have a culture of battle and a deep-seated love of nature. They are long-lived, have an oral tradition, and have very little a Ahoy there me mateys!

They are long-lived, have an oral tradition, and have very little art. The Suthern folk are more like medieval humans.

Both sides dislike the other but have been at a limited peace. Then an upstart Suthern commoner, Bellamus, has a plan to use the Anakim in a plot to gain power and fame.

The Northerner, Roper, is suddenly thrust into a position of power when his father is killed. Can he keep the Anakim intact with also fighting a civil war from within?

I felt that the characters, battles, and politics were a little flat. Me favourite sections were the discussions of the culture of the Anakim and particularly their relationship with nature and hardship.

I also liked the civil war elements of the Anakim sections and the parts that took place at the Northern keep. While in general I cheered for the Anakim side, I did occasionally find Roper to be a ineffectual leader whose successes seemed more lucky than skillful.

Also the set-up for the next book was a bit abrupt in the end. Side note: I wish that fantasy authors would stop using the North as lands of ice, snow, and barbarians and the South as lands of heat, culture, and learning.

There be other cardinal points, folks! So lastly. Thank ye Orbit Books! The Wolf was in parts a challenging read for me and yet by the end I came to admire it.

The Anakim as a race, a culture, as characters are probably some of the most intriguing I have come across in a while. Entirely geared towards war, their bodies are quite literally built for battles, and war is something they take great pride in, and yet, with the exception of a few too ambitious characters, they keep a very level head about their way of life.

The Anakim value their culture, their homes and th The Wolf was in parts a challenging read for me and yet by the end I came to admire it.

The Anakim value their culture, their homes and their country on a very deep-rooted level. The Sutherners, who share the border with the Anakim, are polar opposites.

That is why they are such a voracious race. They have no time, and so they must consume. They each want to see change in their own lifetime.

We know that we just have to wait and change will come. Neither side had hardly enough of that burning desire to occupy the land that was so different to their own.

The Anakim are a culture that settle, firmly and permanently, and the Sutherners would hardly manage in the harsh conditions that the Anakim thrive.

But no matter how devastating the outcome of a war in between two countries is, adding a civil war into the mix ratchets things up another notch.

And so, The Wolf explores the alliances formed, loyalties tested, grudges eliminated… The Black Lord does not cry.

So Roper howled instead. The world building alone is rich, especially that of the Anakim, and Carew left no stone unturned to give readers the full experience.

I do have to say, though, that at times there was perhaps too much information in certain parts. Yes, it was relevant to the particular scene but somehow it still disconnected me from the present timeline of ongoing events.

But as I mentioned earlier- after reconsidering the overall reading experience- I can only admire this book as a whole.

The Anakim and their larger than life war-hardened presence. The Sutherners with their many politically driven ambitions.

This is war!!! And now that the scene is set, I quite look forward to the perilous journey the Black Lord will take me next… Jul 10, Bookwraiths rated it liked it Shelves: e-books , fantasy.

Review to come. I was sure it was gonna be my next favorite book. It had everything I love, even the cover is exactly my cup of tea.

Unfortunately, while the premise was very interesting, the execution fell short for me. Towards the end it got so boring that I skimmed the last pages which I rarely do.

The Wolf by Leo Carew - What it is and what it is not. What it is - It is a meticulously detailed fantasy of medieval-type warfare with a southern nation being the belligerent and the north the invaded.

Nothing in this book is trivial. Every nut and bolt is described. The settings, the cities, the landscape, everything comes alive in the readers mind.

The reader is drawn wholly into the author's world. Battles are bloody and intense. No one comes out unscathed from any encounter.

The realism is authentic. Your tangled guts exposed in the air. You could lose a limb, an eye, your hand; the feeble flesh carved open by steel.

While those elements are in the story, they aren't as relevant as I imagine the author wanted them to be. It is an extremely male-dominated world, hostile and savage.

Men are fiercely loyal to their leaders and friends, to their Houses and lords. Few if any try to escape or rise above their station other than one of the main characters, Uvoren good name , who thinks the boy-king Roper should just serve as a figurehead and let him rule.

The boy-king manages to acquire allies to challenge Uvoren but it seems these alliances aren't based on his talent or skills, but out of their former loyalty to the deceased father and the House, and their concerns over Uvoren, although Uvoren doesn't seem to be anything particularly evil or wretched, just a talented commander without respect for Roper's lineage.

In fact, most of the time, Uvoren seems better equipped to be leader for this particular world than Roper. The enemy is also part of the story and they are pretty much of the same mindset as the people they are invading.

The motivations to invade, fight and survive seem to be the main theme for everyone. I actually took a liking to the Bellamus character. All the men in the story are actually much alike, strong and martial, often in each other's faces if there is a problem.

The brutality is intense. In the end, the books greatest strength is also its greatest weakness. The attention to detail actually serves to distract from some very good verbal exchanges between characters.

I can think of one particular passage offhand where the characters moved through a city and it was like walking in mud, taking nearly three pages to get from one end to the other simply because the author found it necessary to describe everything, and I mean everything they were seeing, hearing, smelling and sensing.

In the end, it put the reader there but it wasn't pertinent to the story. We didn't need that information, not that much.

I like descriptive world building but I had a difficult time reading through this scene and several others like it. I'm pretty sure people who don't enjoy reading that much description would have trouble finishing something like this.

Don't get me wrong. It's a very good book and the author is extremely talented. No doubt he did his homework and his talent bleeds from every page and sentence.

If medieval warfare, blood and guts, male bonding, and two kingdoms fighting to save their cultures is your kind of thing, you will love this book.

If you are looking for an intricate, multi-layered world of schemers and strong female leads, this is not that book. Four stars. Mar 19, Ova - Excuse My Reading rated it liked it.

This book may resemble Game of Thrones. There are couple of differences between the two for me but most important is that I found myself skim-reading this book.

Okay GoT books were long, but they made you float alongside. You didn't skip a single sentence.

Don"t get me wrong, this is not a bad book at all. It just feels exhaustively long. There is yet another fantasy world, and we follow the newly appointed northern 'Black Lord' through his struggle to protect his land from Southerners.

Apr 08, Jon Adams rated it it was amazing. This didn't feel like a debut. I enjoyed it so much that I actually read it on my Kindle at home, which is rare for me.

I much prefer paper. Fascinating world-building, interesting character development, great action. If you dig politics and war, give it a shot.

May 22, RG rated it liked it. This was a pretty good fantasy debut. It had a touch of military heroic fantasy with majority of the storys main focus being the political scheming.

There are two main naitons, the Anakims North and the Sutherners South. The north is more barbarian like as compared to the more civilised South.

I had a hard time with that concept as I felt they were equally civilised and at times the Anakim felt more civislised.

The action was solid, the characters a little one dimensional as they all felt a This was a pretty good fantasy debut. The action was solid, the characters a little one dimensional as they all felt a little too similar.

I really did like Roper and would've loved to have had just him as the one central character. The political scheming element is probably the factor which is reminding people of GoT.

To a degree yes but that's like saying every fantasy novel that has political scheming reminds you of GoT. It does it well but just not as good as GoT.

But I guess thats some of the debut writing coming out. With more experience this element will improve.

The world building is great and I can see more room to grow with the other areas on the map. We got glimpses but nothing overly concrete.

Good solid fantasy with an author I'm sure will provide more novels with his potential. Feb 28, Olivera rated it liked it Shelves: Jan 25, Jashana rated it it was ok Shelves: This was a low 3-star for me -- 5.

TL;DR: Not awful by any means. But not my cup of tea mostly due to writing style and plot. I didn't necessarily "hate read" this book I was determined to finish this book.

It wasn't a miserable read by any means, but for me personally the constant uphill struggle of our main character, Roper, This was a low 3-star for me -- 5.

It wasn't a miserable read by any means, but for me personally the constant uphill struggle of our main character, Roper, was tiresome.

A lot of, "Hey we have a new plan! Oh frick, that isn't working out how we wanted Well damn it, that kind of backfired This kind of a plot is probably fantastic for some, but I am not one of those people.

The world was interesting, which is more or less the only thing that, well, kept my interest! The character development wasn't great.

There was really only one female character who was at all prominent But I didn't feel connected to any of them -- in the intense battles, I did not care one way or another who died.

The writing style is a bit repetitive in parts; we have lonnnggg descriptions that last pages, totally pulling us out of any action that was happening.

I was heavily skimming by the end, not going to lie. Feb 24, Sammie rated it really liked it Shelves: netgalley One-Line Summary: A massive battle of wits, one within a kingdom and one between kingdoms, where the loser forfeits their life and no one truly wins.

So sure of their victory, the Anakim are taken by surprise to find the Sutherners have laid a One-Line Summary: A massive battle of wits, one within a kingdom and one between kingdoms, where the loser forfeits their life and no one truly wins.

So sure of their victory, the Anakim are taken by surprise to find the Sutherners have laid a trapped, one that wipes out many of their soldiers and results in the death of their king, the Black Lord.

Not everyone is so thrilled with the young, inexperienced upstart, though. Uvoren, Master of the Guard, sees his chance to supplant the rule.

The Sutherners have their own upstart. Not exactly young, but from a lowly and ignoble birth, Bellamus intends to do whatever it takes to earn his status in society.

Only one person can win this battle of wits, but at what cost? The Positives: - Strategy and sabotage and stabbiness and supplanting and all the other great S words and other letters, probably, too.

They have to be cunning and always one step ahead. The game of one-upmanship is everything I could have hoped for and then some.

Keturah has her own game going on behind the scenes. Missing ear and all. I really liked the way his character grew through this.

He seems like a worthy adversary for Roper, and I look forward to seeing what he does in the next books. The differences between the cultures and groups is fabulously done.

They each have their own religions and beliefs and ways of approaching life, which makes it pretty nigh on impossible for them to actually understand each other.

I thought the cultures were marvelously done, and I got a really good sense of those two groups. I actually look forward to learning more about the Unhierea, which I assume will come in the later books.

Well, this is about to get interesting. But no. Every time, he unfailingly proved me wrong. That is all I have to say about that.

The Negatives: - As great as the cultural aspect was, the worldbuilding is a bit lacking. Especially for a high fantasy.

The map shows that where this takes place is obviously an island, albeit a decent sized one. But beyond that, this feels like it takes place in a microcosm.

The races are so vastly different the Anakim at around seven feet with bone plates under their skin and the Sutherners, who seem to basically be like normal humans as we know them yet I have no sense of why this is or how it came to be.

Which is problematic, given that I read the whole thing. Well, mostly. I confess, I may have skipped some descriptions when it became too much, so I very well might have missed something rather important.

I guess I pictured them as not entirely human-looking. There were some fantastic and important descriptions, but there were also times when it became overbearing.

I can conjure up the image of a fort just fine without three pages describing the buildings and exactly what it looked like.

It may not be exactly what the author imagined, but it gets the job done. The battles also dragged on in some places and became a bit repetitive.

As I said, I love a good game of wits. I easily found myself taking sides, shaking the book, lecturing characters, and altogether getting embroiled in the war itself.

All in all, this was a good book. Finished re-reading Updated rating 3. So I am giving this another read to see what I think now.

There was nothing "wrong" with this book. I just didn't really enjoy it. The prologue felt too long, and that made it harder for me to get invested in this book.

It was Finished re-reading Updated rating 3. It was well written with well written and developed characters.

I just don't really enjoy books that are very focused on political intrigue. While the characters were well written, I often lost track of who was who.

Their names were hard for me to follow from time to time. As I said, this is in no way a bad book, just not my cup of tea.

Jan 06, Susan Hampson rated it it was amazing. It is one magnificent epic read! Set in medieval times the country is divided into two nations.

The Anakim in the north where they live under the rule of Kynortas, the Black Lord. It is much colder in the north and the people are rugged, living off the land and being trained in battle skills from a young age.

When the armies of the Sutherners are stirred up by a commoner Bellamus, he invades the North, killing Kynortas and leaving his son Roper to take his place as the Black Lord.

Things take a bit of a dive so when Roper and the army return home his ability to rule is in the balance. This is one cracking story of battles, politics and betrayals that centre round three men, Bellamus from the south, Roper who is new in the position of the Black Lord and Uvoren a warrior of Anakim that sees himself a more worthy to rule than Roper.

I soon felt myself taking sides. Roper had so much to prove that he takes pretty dodgy chances with some undesirable people and it makes for some real page turning, take your breath moments.

All played out in glorious technicolour in my mind. So looking forward to the follow-up in April May 09, Kylie rated it liked it Shelves: books-i-own.

I ended up not hating it, but I definitely didn't love it. It's not that it was a bad book, I just think it wasn't for me. It was very hard to get into.

A lot of names were thrown out in the first few chapters and I couldn't remember who they were let alone what side of the war they were on.

It took me quite a long time to even figure out who the main character was. The first large part of the book was about the Anakim and just when I thought I was starting to figure things out, they switched to a character we hadn't even been introduced to who was a Sutherner the other side of the war.

I thought they were still focused on the Anakim so it was very confusing to switch so abruptly to the other side of the war. One thing I kind of disliked about this book was there was a lot of description and not a lot of dialogue.

It made it very hard to read for me. Even though there were 2 very distinct sides of the war, I don't think either one was described as the "bad side.

It would make sense for the Anakim to be the good side, the side we are all rooting for, but really neither side seemed to be the bad side to me.

The hero and the villian were both on the Anakim side. It was a different take for the main character in a war book to be fighting more against someone on their own side rather than the other side of the war.

I really liked Roper as a main character. He gets thrown into a leadership position that is trying to be taken from him.

He doesn't do everything right and makes so many mistakes so sometimes I thought Urovern was going to become Black Lord instead.

So much of this book focuses on the inner war between Roper and Uvoren fighting for the title of Black Lord, but it always goes back to the bigger war of the Anakim versus the Sutherns.

I think my favorite character was Keturah, Roper's wife. Even though they only got married to further Roper's allies, she was so strong and well connected.

Roper went off to war before they even got to know each other and she still helped him and tried to further his alliances within the city.

I also really liked all the characters who were on Ropers side. I especially liked Gray because he was so loyal. This was definitely a slow moving book with a lot of hidden plans and inner politics.

If that is your cup of tea, I would fully recommend this book. Since that isn't for me, I gave it 3 stars. Mar 13, Megan Lyons rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy.

It has a lot of the elements I tend to like in my fantasy; a hero in over his head, political intrigue and a clever protagonist trying to outsmart enemies.

There were times that I got quite into the story, but it didn't resonate with me as much as some of the other fantasy books that it reminded me of.

I've been thinking about "The Wolf," trying to figure out what didn't work for me, and I think the author tried to do a little too much.

I would have liked more politics, or more battles in the vein of "Codex Alera" but by trying to include it all, there was a lack of depth, and some issues of pacing.

This one dragged at times. The other problem I had was that I never quite connected with the protagonist. I liked him and found him interesting, but I don't think I ever quite got to know him, so although I was rooting for him, I wasn't as emotionally invested as I wanted to be.

That being said, I thought it was a solid book and enjoyed it for the most part. The world building was solid, and the author did a really good job of building the societies that inhabited his world.

There were some interesting side characters, and I liked the Southern antagonist. One thing that kind of bugged me was the similarity of the Amikin's bone plate, a sort of natural armor, to that of Parshendi's in Sanderson's "Stormlight Archive.

The author did a great job of finishing off the book, by giving it a satisfying story arc, but leaving a epilogue that set up book 2 quite nicely.

This is a sequel I will likely pick up, and I think the author will likely get stronger over time. Dec 15, Jackie rated it really liked it Shelves: arcs.

View 1 comment. Nov 27, Liz Barnsley rated it it was amazing. Two Sides. One Victor. Kind of although in war everyone loses.

Leo Carew weaves a beautifully descriptive world around a plethora of vibrant, depthful characters, all of whom engage in different ways.

The North and the South are very different beasts There are good guys and bad guys here but certainly not in the traditional sense.. Political shenanigans, betrayal, loyalty, love and life all play their part in this gorgeous, sprawling epic - I adored it and I simply cannot wait to read the next novel.

This may be my new obsession. Highly Recommended. Feb 05, Tad rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , arc. The giants of the northern Black Kingdom, the Anakim, face an invasion from the smaller but more numerous Sutherners from across the river that has been the border of a long but fragile peace.

Roper, son of the Black Lord and leader of the Black Kingdom, finds himself in command during his first battle when his father is slain in battle which leads to the first Anakim defeat in more than a thousand years.

The human Sutherners are led by an ambitious outsider, Bellamus, who aims to put an end to the Anakim once and for all.

Roper retreats to his impenetrable walled fortress to regroup. While the Suthern army rampages throughout the Black Kingdom, Roper must find a way to defeat them while also fending off a challenge to his leadership from the Anakim hero, Uvoren.

The Wolf is historical fantasy at its best. The political maneuverings in the Black Kingdom are deep, twisty and intense.

Roper is both clever and smart, but he is very inexperienced. Carew not only vividly portrays the frozen landscape of the north but describes how it informs the lifestyle of the people who live there.

In June two candidate planets were reported in orbit around Wolf From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the star. For the fictional Star Trek battle, see Battle of Wolf For the podcast, see Wolf podcast. Wolf is shown near the ecliptic in the southern region of Leo bottom middle.

Star portal. Retrieved May The Astronomical Journal. Bibcode : AJ See table II. Astrophysics and Space Science.

The Astrophysical Journal. Bibcode : ApJ See: Lang, Kenneth R. Astrophysical formulae. Astronomy and Astrophysics Library.

Research Consortium on Nearby Stars. Astronomy and Astrophysics. September April October Veroeffentlichungen der Badischen Sternwarte zu Heidelberg.

Bibcode : VeHei July Astronomische Nachrichten. Bibcode : AN Fifteenth Series". Contributions from the Mount Wilson Observatory.

August Astronomical Journal. Astrophysical Journal. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Stars and galaxies.

Greenwood Guides to the Universe. Human vision and the night sky: hot [i. Patrick Moore's practical astronomy series.

September 15, I - The minimum main-sequence mass and luminosity". Astrophysical Journal, Part 1. Astrophysical Journal Letters.

The radius of the Sun is Solar System Exploration. Villanova University. Archived from the original on December Bibcode : RMxAC..

November February Interstellar matters: essays on curiosity and astronomical discovery. National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

March Acta Physica Polonica B. Bibcode : AcPPB.. Reviews in modern astronomy, cosmic matter. Veröffentlichungen des Astronomischen Rechen-Instituts Heidelberg.

Bibcode : VeARI.. Bibcode : RMxAA.. SolStation Company.

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